Be Handy With These 5 Tricks When You Encounter A Stranger Dog

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The possibilities of meeting a stranger dog are endless. How you approach the dog at your first encounter will set the tone for further meetings. Your own behavior at that time will determine the dog’s reaction towards you.

5 Things To Do When Meeting A Stranger Dog

  • Ask The Owner’s Permission First

Dogs tend to be friendly with people who are friends with their pet parents. So, before initiating any form of communication with the dog, say hello to the owner, have a small talk with him and then after sensing the dog’s mood proceed further.

If you feel that, the dog is nervous or showing signs of fear, then it is best to leave him alone immediately. The key line here is ‘Watch His Body Language’.

  • Do Not Make Direct Eye Contact

Avoid making direct eye contact with the dog. He may sense it as an act of aggression on your part.

  • Never Pet A Dog On His Head From Behind

This is very small but an important detail when dealing with dogs. Many people have this habit of coming from behind and start petting a dog on his head. This is a wrong way to greet or pet a dog. They perceive these touches as threatening and may bite in return.

  • Don’t Be Afraid- Let Things Be Natural

    Dogs are master of senses. They will come to know your current state of mind by gauging your body language. If you are fearful or over-excited in front of a dog then the reaction may be negative on his part. So first thing, to keep in mind when you come across a stranger dog is to calm yourself and make no unnecessary gestures.

    The same thing holds true when you come across a stray dog.

  • Stop Interacting

Now if the dog becomes friendly with you, you should know when to stop playing with him. If you sense that he is done with you, leave him alone. That is the best policy you can follow when interacting with any dog.

Dogs are lovely creatures and love friendly interactions. Yet there are a few basics, which are to be taken into account when you meet an unknown dog.